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RequixEclipse

The Golden Rod (Vril Generator)

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RequixEclipse    106

The Golden Rod

(Vril Generator)

I hope to update this OP with corrections and connections soon. So yes I will be adding more information and making it look more pretty soon. Meantime enjoy the food for thought my friends. ?

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 After you give the Golden Rod to Richtofen, it is unknown what he does with it. People say that he uses it as a time travel/teleportation device or uses it to power one. After they leave, the crew is sent to Shangri-La. 

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Micheal Faraday

 

These people consider that in vril they have arrived at the unity in natural energetic agencies, which has been conjectured by many philosophers above ground, and which Faraday thus intimates under the more cautious term of correlation: ‘I have long held an opinion,’ says that illustrious experimentalist, ‘almost amounting to a conviction, in common, I believe, with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, into one another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.’

According to Zee, all Vril-ya are trained in the application of vril, which can be used to control the physical world, including the minds and bodies of others, as well as to enhance the telepathic and telekinetic potentials of the human mind. 

Although greatly impressed with the knowledge and accomplishments of the Vril-ya, the narrator is nevertheless terrified by their power and the ease with which they wield it, implying at one point that, should he have angered them at any time, they would have had no compunction in turning their Vril Staffs on him and reducing him to cinders.
This uneasiness, coupled with his natural desire to return to the upper world and the life with which he is familiar, prompts the narrator to begin seeking a means of escape from the subterranean world of the Vril-ya.
Aid comes in the unlikely form of Zee, who has fallen in love with him and has attempted to persuade him to stay, but who nevertheless understands that an unrequited love cannot result in happiness for either of them.
It is she who leads him back to the mine shaft through which he first entered the realm of the Vril-ya. Upon his return home, the narrator begins to ponder the wonders he has beheld far below the surface of the Earth, and once again hints at the possible dreadful fate awaiting a blissfully unaware humanity at the hands of the ‘Coming Race’.
In the final chapter, we read: 'The more I think of a people calmly developing, in regions excluded from our sight and deemed uninhabitable by our sages, powers surpassing our most disciplined modes and virtues to which our life, social and political, becomes antagonistic in proportion as our civilisation advances, - the more devoutly I pray that ages may yet elapse before there emerge into sunlight our inevitable destroyers.'

It is an assumption of many occultists that 'The Coming Race' is fact disguised as fiction: that Bulwer-Lytton based his engaging novel on a genuine body of esoteric knowledge. He was greatly interested in the Rosicrucians, the powerful occult society which arose in the sixteenth century, and which claimed to possess ancient wisdom, discovered in a secret underground chamber, regarding the ultimate secrets of the Universe.
There is some evidence that Bulwer- Lytton believed in the possibility of a subterranean world, for he wrote to his friend Hargrave Jennings in 1854: ‘So Rosenkreuz [the founder of the Rosicrucians] found his wisdom in a secret chamber. So will we all. There is much to be learned from the substrata of our planet.’ Some writers, including Alec Maclellan, author of the fascinating book 'The Lost World of Agharti' (1996), have suggested that 'The Coming Race' revealed too much of the subterranean world and was, as a result, suppressed in the years following Bulwer-Lytton’s death in 1873. Indeed, he describes the book as ‘one of the hardest to find of all books of mysticism’, and informs us of his own search for a copy, which for some years met with no success. While doubtless an intriguing piece of stage-setting on Maclellan’s part, the rarity of the book can surely be accounted for by the unjust waning of Bulwer-Lytton’s posthumous literary reputation (mentioned earlier). What is the connection between Bulwer-Lytton’s strange novel and the Third Reich ?
If there really was a large colony of Tibetan monks in Berlin in the 1940s, what were they doing there?

 this novel, the narrator, a traveller and adventurer of independent means, explores a mine in an unnamed location and discovers a vast subterranean world, inhabited by a superior race of humans called the Vril-ya. Once tenants of the Earth’s outer surface, the Vril-ya were forced to retreat underground by a natural catastrophe similar to the biblical Flood many thousands of years ago.
Their technology is far in advance of anything to be found in the world of ordinary humanity, and is based on the application of a force known as ‘vril’.
Befriended by a young female Vril-ya named Zee, the narrator asks about the nature of the vril force.
Therewith Zee began to enter into an explanation of which I understood very little, for there is no word in any language I know which is an exact synonym for vril.
I should call it electricity, except that it comprehends in its manifold branches other forces of nature, to which, in our scientific nomenclature, differing names are assigned, such as magnetism, galvanism etc
 
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Dietrich Eckart & Karl Haushofer
It seems that the connection was none other than General/Professor Karl Haushofer(1869-1946) whose theories of Geopolitics gave rise to the concept of Lebensraum (living space), which Hitler maintained would be necessary to the continued dominance of the superior Aryan race and which he intended to take, primarily, from the Soviet Union.
Haushofer, along with Dietrich Eckart(1868-1923) - the journalist and playwright, who influenced Hitler by traiining him iin the occult sciences and, in addition, introduced him to influential social circles after the First World War - is frequently described as a practicing black magician, and probably the master magician of the National Socialist Party’.
 
His knowledge of the Far East earned him a posting as military attache in Japan.
 
While in Japan, Haushofer was initiated into one of the most important secret Buddhist societies, and to have sworn, if he failed in his ‘mission’, to commit suicide in accordance with the time-honored ceremonial.
 
The first of these centres was called Agartha, the other Shambhala
(These names have many different spellings: for Agartha, we use the simplest; for Shambhala, the spelling favoured by Orientalists.)
Among the many books Hitler read while languishing in Landsberg was Bulwer-Lytton’s 'The Coming Race' (see above), which, Haushofer informed him, was an essentially correct description of the race of Supermen living far beneath the surface of the Earth and corroborated much of what the professor had himself learned while travelling in Asia.
Bulwer- Lytton’s novel apparently galvanized Hitler’s imagination, and he ‘began to yearn for the day when he might establish for himself the actuality of the secret civilization beneath the snows of Tibet ...’
In the following year, 1925, the Vril Society (also known as the Luminous Lodge) was formed by a group of Berlin Rosicrucians including Karl Haushofer.
There is only one primary source of information on the Vril Society: Willy Ley, a German rocket engineer who fled to the United States in 1933 and followed a successful career writing popular science books.
In 1947, Ley published an article entitled ‘Pseudoscience in Naziland’.
Following a description of Ariosophy, Ley writes: 'The next group was literally founded upon a novel.
That group, which was more or less localized in Berlin, devoted its spare time looking for Vril. Their convictions were founded upon Bulwer-Lytton’s ‘The Coming Race’.
They knew that the book was fiction, Bulwer-Lytton had used that device in order to be able to tell the truth about this ‘power’.'
The subterranean humanity may have been fiction, but the Vril was not.
Possibly it had enabled the British, who kept it as a State secret, to amass their colonial empire.
 
The Untersberg is known to be inhabited by certain kinds of elemental spirits of Nature, some of which are good and benevolent, others of a wicked and malicious nature, and inimical to mankind; and there are innumerable tales circulating among the people in the neighborhood, telling about the doings of the gnomes, fairies, and giants, dwelling within caves and in gorgeous marble halls and grottoes filled with gold and precious stones that will turn into dead leaves and stones when seen in the light of day.
 
“Some of the friendly tribes come out of the Untersberg on certain occasions, and they are said to have sometimes associated with the inhabitants of our plane of existence, partaking in the dances and amusements of the peasants, and even taking stray children with them into the Untersberg; and, incredible as it may appear, it is even asserted by, “those who know” that marriages have taken place between citizens of our world and the inhabitants of the kingdom of gnomes. Of course it is well known that within the mysterious depths of the Untersberg there dwells the soul of a great emperor in his astral form.
 
There, together with his retinue, he sleeps an enchanted sleep, waiting for the liberation of his country.
Sometimes very suddenly, even on a clear summer day, clouds are seen to issue from the sides of the mountain; grotesquely-formed ghost-like mists arise from the caverns and precipices, crawling and gliding slowly upwards toward the top, and form on the neighboring peaks also, clouds of monstrous shapes and sometimes of gigantic proportions floating on, until the head of the Untersberg is surrounded by a surging sea of vapours growing dense and dark. Seldom included in historical analysis of the Third Reich and Adolf Hitler, is the spiritually mesmerizing impact of Mount Untersberg. Hitler’s first direct encounter took place in 1923, upon which date the future führer would describe his feelings, “It was so wonderful! A view of the Untersberg! Indescribable!”. While not specifically recorded, it is unlikely that the youthful Hitler would have been unaware of the writings of Franz Hartmann. A recent expedition (August 2008) into the gigantic cave-system under the mountain revealed that it goes down so far, that its lowest point had not been reached yet. The cave explorers had to return from their expedition without knowing how far down it goes.
 
In the summer of 1926, Roerich had set up camp with his son, Dr George Roerich, and several Mongolian guides in the Shara-gol valley near the Humboldt Mountains between Mongolia and Tibet.
Roerich had just built a white stupa (or shrine), dedicated to Shambhala.
The shrine was consecrated in August, with the ceremony witnessed by a number of invited lamas.
Two days later, the party watched as a large black bird wheeled through the sky above them. This, however, was not what astonished them, for far beyond the black bird, high up in the cloudless sky, they clearly saw a golden spheroidal object moving from the Altai Mountains to the north at tremendous speed.
Veering sharply to the south-west, the golden sphere disappeared rapidly beyond the Humboldt Mountains.
As the Mongolian guides shouted to one another in the utmost excitement, one of the lamas turned to Roerich and informed him that the fabulous golden orb was the sign of Shambhala, meaning that the lords of that realm approved of his mission of exploration.
Later, Roerich was asked by another lama if there had been a perfume on the air.
When Roerich replied that there had been, the lama told him that he was guarded by the King of Shambhala, Rigden Jye-Po, that the black vulture was his enemy, but that he was protected by a ‘Radiant form of Matter’.
The lama added that anyone who saw the radiant sphere should follow the direction in which it flew, for in that direction lay Shambhala.
The exact purpose of this expedition (aside from exploration) was never made entirely clear by Roerich, but many writers on esoteric subjects have claimed that he was on a mission to return a certain sacred object to the King’s Tower at the centre of Shambhala.
According to Andrew Tomas, the sacred object was a fragment of the Chintamani stone, the great mass of which lies in the Tower.
Astonishingly, the stone is said to have been brought to Earth originally by an extraterrestrial beiAlthough greatly impressed with the knowledge and accomplishments of the Vril-ya, the narrator is nevertheless terrified by their power and the ease with which they wield it, implying at one point that, should he have angered them at any time, they would have had no compunction in turning their Vril Staffs on him and reducing him to cinders.
This uneasiness, coupled with his natural desire to return to the upper world and the life with which he is familiar, prompts the narrator to begin seeking a means of escape from the subterranean world of the Vril-ya.
Aid comes in the unlikely form of Zee, who has fallen in love with him and has attempted to persuade him to stay, but who nevertheless understands that an unrequited love cannot result in happiness for either of them.
It is she who leads him back to the mine shaft through which he first entered the realm of the Vril-ya. Upon his return home, the narrator begins to ponder the wonders he has beheld far below the surface of the Earth, and once again hints at the possible dreadful fate awaiting a blissfully unaware humanity at the hands of the ‘Coming Race’.
In the final chapter, we read: 'The more I think of a people calmly developing, in regions excluded from our sight and deemed uninhabitable by our sages, powers surpassing our most disciplined modes and virtues to which our life, social and political, becomes antagonistic in proportion as our civilisation advances, - the more devoutly I pray that ages may yet elapse before there emerge into sunlight our inevitable destroyers.'
 
It is an assumption of many occultists that 'The Coming Race' is fact disguised as fiction: that Bulwer-Lytton based his engaging novel on a genuine body of esoteric knowledge.
He was greatly interested in the Rosicrucians, the powerful occult society which arose in the sixteenth century, and which claimed to possess ancient wisdom, discovered in a secret underground chamber, regarding the ultimate secrets of the Universe.
There is some evidence that Bulwer- Lytton believed in the possibility of a subterranean world, for he wrote to his friend Hargrave Jennings in 1854: ‘So Rosenkreuz [the founder of the Rosicrucians] found his wisdom in a secret chamber. So will we all. There is much to be learned from the substrata of our planet.’
Some writers, including Alec Maclellan, author of the fascinating book 'The Lost World of Agharti' (1996), have suggested that 'The Coming Race' revealed too much of the subterranean world and was, as a result, suppressed in the years following Bulwer-Lytton’s death in 1873.

 

Connecting this with our current zombies gives us some depth. Samantha could be our Zee whom was mentioned in "Vril." She warned Edward of coming events and to avert the coming apocalypse. You'll find more connections in my previous post about the personality reanimations of our characters. 

 

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