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Tac

The Great Battle: The Key to Understanding Everything

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Tac    462

Hey guys, Tac here! After the zombies community recently watched one of the most entertaining video game showdowns ever (i.e. the Der Eisendrache Easter Egg), it’s time to understand exactly why it happened and what will happen in the rest of the game. What has become clear as we progress through the series is that we’re getting introduced to more and more mythologies. World at War and Black Ops introduced us to the Vril-ya mythos, Black Ops 2 to Norse (sort of, read on), and now in Black Ops 3, they’ve introduced the Cthulhu mythos and ramped up the other two.

This thread spawned from a few things: my deep passion for the storyline, seeing “Ragnarok” in the game achievements, and more generally watching much of the community fumble with how the storyline is progressing. Because of these things, this post goes to show that in zombies, they are mixing each mythology and blending them together because their baseline structures are so similar. I’m going to preface this by saying I did my absolute best to not try and force things to fit. If the puzzle piece didn’t quite fit right, or sound correct, I likely chose to omit it. Some of you may be confused, but it’s right in front of us if you know where to look.

Given that this thread is rather lengthy, it's likely that I forgot to include something or even omit something. If you find an error, let me know!

 

The Vril-ya

A long time ago, Monopoly Mac and I made one of the forefront Vril-ya threads at that time. In it, we discussed the extensive history of not only the Vril-ya, but the German obsession in them as well. As the years have passed since the thread’s publishing, some things have stayed the same and of course, some things have changed. The original thread can be found here, but the truly relevant information is below.


In Vril-ya mythos, there was a solar system named Aldebaran that had a sun revolving around two inhabited planets, forming the empire “SUMERAN”. Living on these inhabitable planets were two cohabitable races of beings, one master and one subservient, both capable of great spiritual and physical feats. The master race was known as giant “light God people,” and the subservient race came about through  the two distinct races intermixed further and further, their capabilities slowly diminished. A point came where they could no longer live on their home planet and had to move elsewhere, so the master race, capable of traveling time and space, evacuated them. The source of the Vril-ya’s powerful psychic and technological advancements was Vril. When employed, they could achieve great telekinetic abilities and through great acts of medicine, could live up to the age of one thousand years. However, if used the wrong way, those rods could be used for great destruction.

 

Legend has it that they first arrived on a planet known as Mallona (also called Marduk), which existed in what is today’s asteroid belt, between Mars and Jupiter. They moved inwards in the Solar System, inhabiting Mars and then Earth, landing in the Mesopotamia region. From here, legend gets a bit more difficult to sift through, but the basic plot is able to be discerned. They split into two factions, where one faction migrated towards the Gobi Desert and eventually landed in Atlantis and the other went to Hyperborea (which is actually from the Greek mythos). The Atlanteans became engaged in a series of wars with another group, the Lemurians, and the danger of improperly using Vril came to light. The wars were described as thermonuclear and when the dust settled, little was left besides a vast and open desert. It is said that both the Atlantean and Lemurian homelands had been weakened by the wars, and in the aftermath, they each knew they’d need to move and change their ways. Accordingly, they created the subterranean world known as Agartha, with the capital city of Shambhala, in the Earth’s Core, Hollow Earth. As the center of intellectual progress and enlightenment, and is powered by the Black Sun, or Schwarze Sonne, a black star located within the Earth itself said to contain and radiate Vril energy. It is said that one day, the Vril-ya are going to leave Earth and colonize another planet.

 

The Ragnarok

Ragnarok, as described in old Norse Mythology, is the set of future events where gods such as Odin, Thor, and Freya will battle against the jotuns, or world-devourers, and end their nine worlds as they know them.[1] The gods are described as “the benefactors and protectors of civilization,” while the world-devourers “are forces of destruction, entropy, and decay,” as they are “constantly trying to drag it back to primordial chaos.” It’s said that Odin handpicked the best human warriors he could find to fight the jotuns, but they knew deep down the results would be terrifying.[2] Preceding these events, it is said that three years of winter come, with no summer in between, leading to wars worldwide. There will then be three roosters crowing: one crimson, another golden, another soot red (the last being from Hel, the realm of the dead).[3] Garmr, the blood-stained watchdog hound of Hel, howls, “and the wolf run free” as its chains are broken. (Some sources compare Garmr to either/both Cerberus or a “hellhound,” but the original text says watchdog). He is not the only one set free, however, as Loki escaped his bonds and set sail for Asgard, the Nordic land of the gods. Heimdall, an Asgard watchman, saw the advancement and blew the horn to inform the realm of dead soldiers that the battle had now begun. Then the immense World Tree (whose roots connect the nine worlds of Norse mythology) shuddered.

 

The results were as predicted by Odin and company, and there were three major instances of heroes killing each other (Thor and sea serpent Jormungand, Freyr and world-devourer Surt, and Loki and Heimdall). Odin also falls, but he to Garmr, who is then killed by Odin’s son. The world was now nothing and as the battle came to an end, the war-torn land sank into the sea. There was a saving grace, however, as a male and female (Lif and Lifprasir) had hid out in a forest (some say the World Tree) when the winters hit, and “from them generations will spring.” Another character that comes into play is the devourer Nidhogg, who is a “dragon/serpent/snake” in Hel that lives and chews on corpses. It’s said that “ … Nidhogg sucked / the blood of the slain, / and the wolf-tore men” from his place in Hel. Because Hel is underneath the World Tree, and Nidhogg’s intentions are to cause chaos, he often gnaws at the roots of the world tree.[4][5] He actually flies out over the Ragnarok battlefield to gather corpses to feed his never-ending hunger.[6]

 

Lovecraft

YOEsJUG.jpg

Shoutout to @BlindBusDrivr for finding the real-life image
 

There existed a group known as the Elder Things, who were the first extraterrestrial beings to come to Earth. Their technological capabilities were immense, capable of “personal locomotion” via “no external aid” (likely through their wings). They created a servitor race known as the Shoggoths, having great size and strength in order to labor for the Elder Things. Originally, they were hypnotically controlled by their creators and only capable of living in water. Some of the Shoggoths mutated, however, gaining independent minds and the ability to live on land. They subsequently rebelled against the Elder Things, but were quelled and watched much more closely afterwards.[1][2]

 

There existed another group, the Outer Gods, who were ruled by the most powerful being in the mythos, Azathoth. While both the Elder Things and Outer Gods were similar in many ways (such as being incredibly powerful and working at a cosmic level), there were key differences between them. The first difference was that while the Elder Things were an intelligent race, the Outer Gods were “mindless blasphemies” with Azathoth as their “blind idiot god.” (Azathoth’s primary servant and messenger, Nyarlathotep, uses his great intelligence to often manipulate the mindless Azathoth.[3] More on Nyarlathotep later, though.) The second difference was their attitude towards humanity, as the Outer Gods wanted nothing more than for humanity to die off or become slaves. While the Elder Things historically looked down on humanity, they were occasionally sympathetic to them and the two’s interests often aligned.[4] The final difference is location, with Elder Things being located on Earth and the Outer Gods generally being in deep space.

 

The Great Old Ones are the last “main” group of the mythos, once presiding over the Earth as rulers and gods[5] (all still being worshipped by devoted cults). They have since been imprisoned in various locations around Earth, though the reason is unknown. The two leading theories are that either the Elder Gods cast them away for a deed they disapproved of, or the Great Old Ones are as they are because of their own actions. The most famous of these Great Old Ones is Cthulhu (pictured above), whose name is noticeably similar to the Greek word “chthonic,” meaning “subterranean” (as suggested in a Lovecraft tale itself). He’s described as a combination of a dragon, man, and giant octopus (esp. on his head), and is particularly malevolent. He is imprisoned and hibernating in the underwater city of R’yleh, waiting to be unwittingly exposed and return to the world. What happens if he were to awake, however, is uncertain.[6] Also in the mythos are many smaller groups, such as the Deep Ones, who are an ocean-dwelling race with an appeal towards mating with humans. Another are the Mi-go, which are a scientifically and technologically superior extraterrestrial species made from matter not even naturally occurring on Earth. They have soft wings for flying through the “ether of outer space” and are capable of “removing [a] subject's brain and placing it into a ‘brain cylinder’, which can be attached to external devices to allow it to see, hear, and speak.”[7]

 

The Connections

 

Part 1 - The Energies

 

Spoiler

What should now be clear is that we have those very distinct mythos occurring that we need to begin meshing not only with each other, but with an entirely other mythos (zombies), so where do we start? Though this may seem unrelated and more-or-less random, I think the proper introduction revolves around the various energies in zombies. Thus far, we have encountered four energies: Aether, Ethereal Energy, Element 115, and Vril. What I propose is that they are all one in the same. Or rather, very closely related to one another. However, the prologue is just as important

I mentioned that the first reference we had to the Nordic was sort of in Black Ops 2 (via the Origins giant robots: Odin, Thor, and Freya), to which I meant we had actually encountered the Nordic references earlier, though discreetly. Before Black Ops came out, we got the GKNOVA6 drop and Treyarch was giving us clues about the story. In it was an edited image of the Illuminati pyramid from American currency (seen below, more on the text later), with the eye being replaced by a Black Sun. On it was also the line “Believe in the Welteis and the dead start walking” (after deciphering, of course). The Welteis is in reference to Welteislehre, or the Cosmic Ice Theory, which came from Austrian engineer and cosmologist Hans Horbiger. While observing the Moon in 1894, he was struck with the epiphany that certain characteristics of its surface must have been due to ice. He further developed his theory with a colleague and published it in 1912, wherein the basic premise was that the Universe and all within it originated from the cold, with ice being “a world building material.” He theorized that when a dead, waterlogged star fell into a gigantic star, a massive explosion occurred that sent fragments of the smaller star out into what he called the “global ether.”

meRNIlI.jpg

He portrayed his theory to the public as “cosmic truth” and later aligned with the Nazi Party, who bolstered his theory and used it to essentially counter Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Nazi supporters of the theory, such as Heinrich Himmler and Hitler himself, said things like “Our Nordic ancestors grew strong in ice and snow; belief in the Cosmic Ice is consequently the natural heritage of Nordic Man.”[1][2][3][4] Other than this very clear reference to the Nordic (think: Ragnarok), we’ve heard of this “ether” in two other mythos (Lovecraft and Zombies).  The term ether is interchangeable with the words aether and void, which is known well in the Zombies mythos as a dimension that can be accessed whenever we teleport, and also one in which the ruler can control the undead. (This is the first connection among the set of energies, showing aether is ethereal energy.) And, actually, we also know aether as something very close to the Greeks interpretation. (The idea of aether can be rather complex, with many different interpretations about what it can be, but note that they’re all describing the same things.)

Aristotle said that aether was the “fifth element” in the system of the classical elements. He said that this fifth element had none of the qualities that appeared in the four classical elements (i.e. hot, cold, wet, dry) and while the latter moved terrestrially, the former moved in the celestial regions and heavenly bodies. When Plato, Aristotle’s mentor, spoke about aether, he called it “the most translucent kind” of air, while Greek mythos thought of it as “the pure essence that the gods breathed, filling the space where they lived.” In addition, 18th century scientists proposed that as sound needed air to travel, or ripples needed water, light needed some medium to move in. This medium became known as the luminiferous aether (which is the title of a book in Der Eisendrache, for your information).[5] As winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics put it, aether, overall, was “an ancient Greek idea that heavenly bodies were propelled through space by an idealized, crystalline aether.”[6]

Wait a second... crystalline? Could it be that what Hans Horbiger was actually seeing that night was never ice, but crystalline aether? After all he did say it was this “ice” that made up the “global ether.” In addition, we have the GKNOVA6 line “Believe in the Welteis and the dead start walking.” We now know what the Welteis is in reference to, and “the dead start walking” is very clearly related to Group 935’s activities. By adhering to this outlook on science, the Nazi’s birthed Group 935 (remember, 935 = ICE). Another connection regarding the energies can be made at this point. Medieval alchemists believed that there were four classical elements as well as a fifth, which they called quintessence, and they too believed it was the medium that made up the heavenly bodies. Because this quintessence, or aether, was thought to be heavenly and pure, they believed consumption of it could be used to heal all illnesses. This has spurred the term quintessence to become synonymous with many things, including elixirs and the philosopher’s stone itself. At this time, you may be thinking, “Tac, nowhere have we heard of Group 935 working with Aether or ethereal energy.”

Recall that the energy of the Vril-ya, Vril, was said to have incredible healing powers as well. Not to mention, Dr. Maxis was working on “a project … at Der Riese concerning Vril,” while the recently founded Moon Pyramid Device was “an ancient Vril machine” with “a direct connection to another dimension.” We know this dimension to be Aether. Additionally, it should be mentioned that some thought aether was inside of us, and was the very life force of humans. It's the substance that makes up our soul, so could this be why we have to kill zombies around various objects? Their souls, their life force, their vril, is being absorbed?[7] Finally, to connect these three even further before moving onto Element 115, it’s worth remembering Buried and the role of Michael Faraday (pictured below). Michael Faraday was a scientist and inventor, who discovered the link between electricity and magnetism. He also happened to believe that “the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest, have one common origin,” and in the most influential book regarding Vril, The Coming Race, that quote is used to describe Vril. In Buried, we have the Paralyzer and Time Bomb, both of which are devices running on ethereal energy and harnessing the power of space and time. Could it be that Michael Faraday was working with this energy in that cavern in Africa?

52CvXyh.png

To add to this, the case could be made that the Focusing Stone from Shangri-La, which we concentrated from Element 115 to Vril, is a reference to the Philosophers Stone, which is running on this aether. This is the final link in showing that Aether, Ethereal energy, Vril, and Element 115 may indeed be the same thing, or very similar. But it also brings us full circle with GKNOVA6, because Shadows of Evil gave us a note with the following on it:

tTyPvP0.png

 

We can see what looks like ice shards next to the message that “115 is the fabric … the thread holding it all together … the webbing of the universe.” Could it be that these ice crystals are the “crystalline aether” (which I believe to have shown is Element 115)?

 

Part 2 - The Mythos

 

Spoiler

Now, we may move into the mythos! Seeing as much of the Vril-ya mythos occurred in the past, it is essentially established. We can see this through the numerous Agartha and Vril references in the game, as well as the very existence of our Shangri-La and Call of the Dead maps (read on for the latter). What some may not realize, however, is that we’ve actually seen the Vril-ya in the zombies mythos! They wear the Black Sun on their chest and are called Keepers, but they’re just as much Vril-ya. This is indicated many places in zombies, but most prominently in Der Eisendrache, when we see their heavy connection to the Vril-ya’s Moon Pyramid Device. Remember the two factions of the Vril-ya that I brought up? Well, I mentioned that one went to Hyperborea, which many ancients suggested was somewhere far North. A location that was consistently brought up was Siberia, which led myself and many others to believe that Call of the Dead was actually Hyperborea. Considering the vast Vril references on the map, this made sense. Contrastingly, the other faction traveled to East Asia and established Shangri-La as an entrance to Agartha.

(One particularly “credible” occult author and site[1] suggests this faction was slightly corrupted, and may have actually been evil or had evil inclinations. They describe it as the Hyperborea faction following the Wheel of the Golden Sun, and the Shangri-La faction following the Wheel of the Black Sun. In-game evidence that may support this comes from the Shangri-La easter egg, wherein one of the steps includes stepping on tiles with Illuminati symbols on them. References to the Illuminati were littered throughout World at War and Black Ops, with a major one being that the Illuminati were likely the voices in Dr. Richtofen’s head after touching the MPD, which we know has Vril-ya origins. The symbolism of the MPD being a very large, black pyramid could also be seen as a sign that the Illuminati and this faction of the Vril-ya are one in the same.

Let us not forget the image mentioned above, the GKNOVA6 document with the Black Sun atop an Illuminati pyramid. Also in the GKNOVA6 drop was a message that “Hell is Purple,” so the community believed that because Der Riese says “Return Through Aether” and teleporting filled our screen with purple, Aether may have actually been Hell. (It should be noted that whether the “Hell is Purple” message refers to this is debated, as it may have solely been a clue for the viral campaign.) This concept of Aether being Hell was expanded upon by @Rissole25 when he looked at many aspects of the game and concluded that the man behind the mirror, so to speak, may indeed be Lucifer.[2] Take this information as you wish.)

While much of this was found years ago, something that the community didn’t realize until recently was that Lemuria, the continent fought and sunk by the Atlanteans, was still alive and kicking. The continent of Lemuria shrunk into a mere island known as Pohnpei, in which exists a city known as Nan Madol. To some, though, it’s R’yleh, and the Great Cthulhu lies there sleeping until he is awoken. There’s a group in the zombies mythos, however, that likely side with Great Cthulhu and wish to do great harm. They are known as the Overlords, and they wish to assimilate our dimension and make it their own. They operate through their messenger, the Shadow Man, who’s known as Nyarlathotep in the Cthulhu mythos. I mentioned earlier that he’s the exception to the rule of being in space and speaking alien languages, meaning that he frequently walks around Earth in the guise of a human being that can speak like any other human. He’s described as having numerous different forms, but is generally known for being a tall, slim, joyous man.

The real connections come when we further incorporate the Norse mythos, though. I mentioned how the events of Ragnarok are gods fighting world-devourers, and note that the Zombies mythos contains Overlords trying to “assimilate our dimension.” Additionally, Norse mythos mentions that Odin hand picked a team of incredible human warriors even though all knew that they would lose. Much of the rhetoric coming from the characters is quite ominous, with Nikolai saying his “fate is sealed” (and the children’s being one of hope) and the Shadows of Evil cipher saying “PRIMIS will fail.” Take a look at the following painting in Der Eisendrache:

54YYZIt.png

When the characters approach the painting of the Kraken terrorizing the castle, their quotes are telling. Nikolai asks, “We’re not going to fight that thing, are we?” and Takeo says “I have heard many tales of such creatures; I fear they may be more than just folklore.” This all sounds as if they’re going to see the Kraken in some upcoming battle, so perhaps it’s the Ragnarok? Finally, Tank says “They say war is hell, but this looks like a war with Hell,” which reincorporates the presence of the Devil or Lucifer. Along with this, we have the Shadows of Evil Pack-a-Punch room with a depiction of the characters in some large battle:

gOWIAT0.png

The various references to hellhounds and Cerberus essentially need to go unexplained, but the end of world scenario requires much closer attention. It describes a world that sinks into the ocean and in Der Eisendrache, after the Easter Egg is complete, we blow up the Moon, which everyone ought to know will wreck with the tides and cause mass flooding. Along with this, it speaks of two individuals, Lif and Lifprasir, who hide out in a forest and subsequently repopulate the Earth. We know that Dr. Maxis has introduced his daughter Samantha to a friend named Eddy, and they both play together. Could it be that this drawing is a depiction of such a thing?

KKEikxP.png?1

Finally, the description of Nidhogg, the “dragon/serpent/snake” in Hel that lives and chews on corpses, sounds extremely similar to the dragon we have in Der Eisendrache. The fact that it appears to be out of the combat in the Shadows of Evil battle depiction could be a sign that it isn’t fighting, but perhaps just flying out over the battlefield to collect corpses? We’ve had various depictions of dragons or serpents throughout the game (Shangri-La’s nagas, Great Leap Forward’s dragon, Nero’s Shadows of Evil rug, Shadows of Evil wall (bottom right), Der Eisendrache’s dragons), so could they all be depicting this? Takeo, and supposedly Dr. Richtofen, have quotes about how they will see this dragon again. Could this be a reference?

 

The End - Potential Issues
 

Spoiler

Now, I’ll be the first to admit when a post of mine has potential holes in it. First and foremost, the nature of PRIMIS and what role they have in the story is pretty complicated and undefined. There is a Der Eisendrache cipher that says, “After the great battle, they stood upon the mound. Their light shone down and cleansed all the sickness for as far as the eye could see. They are the first; they are the last… visions of fractured worlds and strange rooms haunted our dreams.” This cipher is a very clear reference to the PRIMIS scrap (pictured below), but if they won this Great Battle, then what about Odin’s handpicked warriors not surviving and Nikolai’s fate being sealed? I feel as though the competing Ragnarok v PRIMIS theories can be unified, though we will see.

 

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anonymous    322

Wow....you really got something here.

You connect the 3 biggest mysteries from the black ops trillogy: The Vrill Ya, the Ragnorak and lovecraft.

Great work!

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NaBrZHunter    488

An epic post, and though I don't like the various mythos and wish we could have just stuck with Vril, this is well researched and documented.

...with one exception. You really wedged Lucifer in there. :-P That could have been omitted altogether. I need to just sit down and write a thread countering that entire idea.

But back on topic, I think this gives us a bit of a leg up, and while I don't believe it will reveal the fate of Primis (remember, this is a multiverse, so  ehegbbleble...excuse me. I was gonna say: anything can happen now alternative to other worlds.)

So while Primis may have been destroyed in the original legend, I highly doubt it would happen here, especially as involves the Pedo Bear theory that Sam and Eddy will be the ones to repop-ehegbbleble-ahem...repopulate the earth. How disturbing. ;) For one, it is too close to the Ragnarok mythos, for two, it wouldn't fit well in the story, and for three...it would be weird. Truly weird. Weird as all hell. lol

Regardless, this thread is legendary. Thanks for such a massive, easy-to-read contribution to the site. Definitely should be archived.

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Tac    462
On 2/25/2016 at 11:46 AM, NaBrZHunter said:

You really wedged Lucifer in there. :-P That could have been omitted altogether. I need to just sit down and write a thread countering that entire idea.

But back on topic, I think this gives us a bit of a leg up, and while I don't believe it will reveal the fate of Primis (remember, this is a multiverse, so  ehegbbleble...excuse me. I was gonna say: anything can happen now alternative to other worlds.)

So while Primis may have been destroyed in the original legend, I highly doubt it would happen here, especially as involves the Pedo Bear theory that Sam and Eddy will be the ones to repop-ehegbbleble-ahem...repopulate the earth. How disturbing. ;) For one, it is too close to the Ragnarok mythos, for two, it wouldn't fit well in the story, and for three...it would be weird. Truly weird. Weird as all hell. lol

I will address this at a later point, when ZNS hasn't just launched. Keep this in mind!

I want to point out that as stated in @MrRoflWaffles video, the Razorback is in Zetsubou No Shima and when Pack-a-Punched, the name of it is Gullinbursti. Just like the Ragnarok DG-4 was the name of something in Norse (and had massive implications), this weapon name also tells a tale.

The Gullinbursti, or Gold Mane or Golden Bristles, also comes from Norse mythology and is the name of a boar. It's not just any boar, of course, but made from pigskin and thousands of pieces of gold wire. This is because Loki (who we have said may be analogous to the Shadow Man) made a bet that after collecting various items, his brother could not make something that rivaled the quality of those items. So, the attempt was made to do just that, and Gullinbursti is what arrived. It can "run through air and water better than any horse, and it could never become so dark with night" that he could not see, as his mane and bristles glow.

So, while largely insignificant (I suspect), it's another interesting Norse mythology tie!

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NaBrZHunter    488
2 minutes ago, Tac said:

I will address this at a later point, when ZNS hasn't just launched. Keep this in mind!

I want to point out that as stated in @MrRoflWaffles video, the Razorback is in Zetsubou No Shima and when Pack-a-Punched, the name of it is Gullinbursti. Just like the Ragnarok DG-4 was the name of something in Norse (and had massive implications), this weapon name also tells a tale.

The Gullinbursti, or Gold Mane or Golden Bristles, also comes from Norse mythology and is the name of a boar. It's not just any boar, of course, but made from pigskin and thousands of pieces of gold wire. This is because Loki (who we have said may be analogous to the Shadow Man) made a bet that after collecting various items, his brother could not make something that rivaled the quality of those items. So, the attempt was made to do just that, and Gullinbursti is what arrived. It can "run through air and water better than any horse, and it could never become so dark with night" that he could not see, as his mane and bristles glow.

So, while largely insignificant (I suspect), it's another interesting Norse mythology tie!

Good observations, as always!

 

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