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Showing most liked content on 05/09/2016 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Edit: disclaimer: I'm tired and not a physicist yet. I might be wrong about stuff. Ok, so, i'm putting it in the simplest terms here, and typing really fast in the spirit of a crash course. Anyway Physics is my 2nd love, behind zombies, much like our favorite Melon / my idol @MrRoflWaffles. I kinda wanna tackle a little thingy that occurred to me, but it takes a little mutual physics knowledge to discuss. Anyway here's a quick lesson. Ok, so all of your DNA, and cells, and in fact all matter is made of atoms. These consist of a nucleus made of neutrons with no electrical charge, and protons with a positive charge. They are surrounded by electrons with negative charges that orbit the nucleus. like with magnets, opposites attract, so the electrons are pulled in to the protons in the nucleus. The protons in the nucleus have a like charge but are held together by a powerful nuclear binding force. Imagine attaching 2 balls to opposite ends of a bug spring and squeeeeeezing them together. Lots of stored up energy there because they want to jump apart, like the protons. anyway, nuclear bombs work by effectively releasing that spring in one nucleus by shooting stuff at the nucleus. This breaks up the nucleus and throws out little bits of crap in an explosion. These bits then hit other atoms' nuclei, and set off a chain reaction that ends up looking like this: Additionally, like I said before, like charges repel. When you're sitting on a chair, your ass never actually comes in contact with it. You're effectively just hovering above the surface without touching, as the electrons on the outside of the atoms are repelling. When you touch something and feel it, you're just feeling the electrons in your finger repelling the electrons in the object. Anyway, imagine a brick wall. This wall is made of neutrons, electrons, and protons. Now imagine you're holding a negatively charged baseball, like an electron. If you throw it at the wall it bounces off because of the electrons in the wall. Throwing a positively charged basketball, like a proton, will yield the same result, as the protons in the wall repel it. However, imagine a soccer ball with no charge. this is your neutron, and lemme tell ya, neutrons don't give a shit. It isn't repelled by anything so if you throw it, it'll just go straight through the wall. However, it turns out neutrons are really not the biggest fans of your DNA. They'll bump into protons and break down your chromosomes and kill you horrifically if you get blasted with a lot of them. If you've heard of something referred to as radioactive, it means the atom has a huge nucleus made up of an absolute ton of neutrons and protons, so many that they are basically leaking and throwing bits out. these bits hit your cells and give you the symptoms of radiation. Anyway some scientists were like bruh, we gotta weaponize these neutrons. Thus the neutron bomb was born, and very nearly used in actual warfare. It seemed like a perfect plan. Effectively they modified nuclear bombs in such a way that they ejected 10x as many neutrons. The result was that within a 0.8 mile radius, any people would have their DNA fried and die, but it allegedly left buildings and infrastructure intact. Remember what I said about the soccer ball going through the wall? Imagine a nuke that kills everyone, but leaves your buildings standing, so you can follow up by just walking into an empty city that's fully intact and meet no opposition. HMMM, a nuke that kills everyone but miraculously doesn't damage structures. Where have we seem that before? Yup, I think the Ka-Boom Nukes are inspired by the neutron bomb. So why does this matter? You might be saying to yourself "So what EJ, they based a seemingly magical gameplay mechanic on a bit of real science, it doesn't change anything, does it?" Well here's the thing. A neutron bomb explains why zombies die from the nukes but the terrain is unaffected. Why, then, can the players survive? This almost makes me speculate that being exposed to 115 without actually being dead beforehand re-enforces your DNA somehow. Well we already know from the song "We All Fall Down" that this is potentially the case. "We used the helicase to bind the CXV." CXV is 115 in roman numerals, and helicase is an enzyme for binding nucleic acid-- the NA in DNA. Think about it-- literally every character to come in contact with the nuke power-up has spent a significant amount of time in a 115-infested area. Even the soldiers on Nacht had to have been sitting on it, otherwise the zombies wouldn't have shown up. Unfortunately, 115 incidentally also does some pretty unpleasant things to dead bodies, as we already know. So I guess my actual "question" is, what the hell does 115 do to our DNA? We know based on Jason Blundell's responses to waffles' questions that the O4 are guaranteed to be human, but does 115 maybe make them a bit more than just that? Did Richtofen get his (radiation-proof) super-soldiers after all?
  2. 1 point
    Finally finished tonight. Took longer than we wanted, but were barely ever to play.
  3. 1 point
    I play Black Ops 3 zombies just like I played the older ones. For example: Why wouldn't Der Eisendrache be fun without a (upgraded) bow? It's a gorgeous map and tons of fun with a gun. The rituals in Shadows of Evil.... Some people may complain that the game is always the same in the low rounds and that you have to do the 'boring setup' every time. Isn't it nice to have a quest while the zombies climb through the windows slower than yo' granny? If you really get fed up with the game, you might be playing too much. I play a handful of games a week and I still have fun doing the rituals on Shadows. Listening to the character quotes while being afraid because you don't have juggernog yet... I like it. Besides.... what did you guys do on round 4 or 5 in Kino der Toten? Not all that much. I do like buildables and feeding dogs and such. I think the older maps don't have all that much to them. Kino is decent and back in the days it was really something, but I think the newer maps have more options for playing it in different ways. I think the maps where there is so much to do are great! I just play and for the sake of having a mission of some sorts I do roll with the modern times. But overall, I just try to shoot zombies and have fun with a group of them chasing me. Cease fire when you see a double points, because points are fun to get. Especially with a lmg when the points still go up by the time you are reloading it. About sprinting zombies, you can reload while running in black ops 3, so instead of buying speed cola, you just buy stamin up, it's even cheaper for us, hahaha.
  4. 1 point
    All decent advice, but the thing that was causing the difficulty - being slowed down to a crawl's pace when you got hit - has now been removed via patch and you now only get slowed down a little. Training everywhere is easier now :)
  5. 1 point
    @NaBrZHunter I gotta say, I very much appreciate this thread! It's good to know there are others like me out there! I resisted all temptations to watch any footage of DE for the month before it dropped on Xbox, I do my best to avoid spoilers and pretty much refuse to google things. For me it's all about the discovery, and nothing compares to working things out at your own pace. So far I've managed to upgrade one bow and have discovered a couple of steps for another. The third ragnarok DG-4 part is still evading me too! Good luck to all my fellow non-googlers! PS. If anyone with a similar mindset wants to join forces on any of the current/future maps, hit me up on Xbox, gamertag same as username.
  6. 1 point
    Thanks! I actually have a group of friends I'm doing it with, but they aren't CoDz members (well one is but he's extremely inactive). It's actually a lot of fun and there's nothing like that feeling of finding a random step and freaking out. So far my group has found out how to upgrade all four bows, but we haven't been able to go much this week. But we're going to knock it out soon. It just takes patience and trial and error. Eventually, something tends to pop.